A1
Decolonising health research for development [paper]

Convenors:
Maureen Mackintosh (Open University)
Geoffrey Banda (University of Edinburgh)
Julius Mugwagwa (UCL)
Location:
Jenny Lee, Meeting Room 1
Start time:
20 June, 2019 at 9:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel aims to share "local health" research that challenges "global health" framing of LMICs as recipients of in-bound knowledge and technologies, or empirical fodder for Western theoretical framings, reinserting health-related research into broader efforts to decolonise development.

Long abstract:

While the huge rise in "global health" funding in recent years has created major health benefits, notably access to HIV and TB medication, it has also strongly framed and directed health-related research in LMICs. This panel aims to explore and showcase other approaches: "local health" research that challenges the framing of LMICs as recipients of in-bound knowledge and technologies, or empirical fodder for Western theoretical framings, and reinserts health-related research into locally-led developmental agendas in these countries. We therefore invite, not papers that focus on critiques of "global health", but rather papers and other inputs (e.g. short videos) that share a diversity of efforts to shift health research in LMIC contexts towards a "decolonised" framework of research methodologies and approaches, shaped by local and by "bottom up" priorities. We welcome papers, for example: that explore the implications and contradictions of embedding health research, innovation and health policy initiatives in broader developmental agendas, including the push for local industrialisation; that discuss the efforts of social movements, and local funding and decision-making systems in reorienting health research and innovation towards social goals including broader social determinants of health; that use methodologies, from photovoice to nurse-led investigations, that upend conventional research hierarchies and promote local research agenda setting; that use action-learning to generate long term local research engagement responding to local developmental needs; that use social science research to decolonise health systems curricula and subvert epidemiologically- and clinically-led research settings: in short, that bring health research into broader efforts to decolonise development.

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers:

Accepted Papers: