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Accepted Paper:

Health, care, and the economy in Argentina. Moral values regimes in Pandemic  

Author:

Mariano Perelman (Universidad de Buenos Aires- CONICET)

Paper short abstract:

From approaching Pandemic from the analytical lens of the ways in which people demand and express ways of living (and dying), in this presentation I am interesting on showing the multiple forms that “pandemic” acquired in Argentina.

Paper long abstract:

From approaching Pandemic from the analytical lens of the ways in which people demand and express ways of living (and dying) -with special attention to the ways in which they conceive and experience isolation policies-, in this presentation I am interesting on showing the multiple forms that “pandemic” acquired in Argentina.

The pandemic put life forms at stake and has generated processes of uncertainty. Advancing along this path, investigating the way in which moral regimes are stressed, allows us to see the multiplicity of ways of understanding what is happening today.

My argument is that although Pandemic is global, it is also eminently local. The Pandemic is a social product in the way it is managed, as it has been built into a public problem, and in its effects. It is from here that we can understand the existence of these multiplicities of ways of living isolation as well as the solutions that are wielded in such a situation. The way in which people act and generate social forms of seeing, demanding, living the quarantine and the pandemic depends on moral frameworks that are disputed and that are publicly expressed. I will center on three of these forms of legitimation: Health, economy and care. From here I will show the way people mobilized moral and public arguments, the way care, economy and health are space of dispute and forms of constructing and demining for a way of living.

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