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Accepted Paper:

The biopolitics of space-based data: Collecting big data through the Covid-19 test  
Kiheung Kim (Pohang University of Science and Technology)

Paper short abstract:

This article focuses on how the retrieved anonymized data is processed to utilize the shape of complicated networks of controlling covid-19. In particular, the relationship between the testing system and the specific way of controlling the disease is based on space, not individual behaviour.

Paper long abstract:

There are various ways of controlling the disease during the covid-19 pandemic. One of the main methods of controlling the disease was rigorous testing the infected and potentially infected person. In particular, South Korea and some countries in East Asia implemented aggressive and rigorous covid-19 tests to find infected patients and the potentially infected in the early stage of the pandemic. Testing, especially PCR tests became a household name for the K-quarantine policy. The testing system faces the sensitive issue of dealing with personal data of bioinformation. Soon after the outbreak of MERS in 2015, the lawmakers in South Korea legislated a new law to protect personal bioinformation in the situation of outbreaks of infectious diseases though, the anonymized personal bioinformation is a part of the big data system to figure out how the infected patients and their contacts are moving in a certain space. The testing and tracing system is the main backbone of the government’s policy for containing and preventing the disease in South Korea. This article focuses on how the retrieved anonymized data is processed to utilize the shape of complicated networks of controlling covid-19. In particular, the relationship between the testing system (PCR technology) and the specific way of controlling the disease is based on space, not individual behaviour.

Panel P05a
Plastic Data – bioinformation, coloniality and the promise of data futures
  Session 1 Thursday 9 June, 2022, -