Click on a panel/paper star to add/remove this to your individual schedule.
You need to be logged in to avail of this functionality, and to see the links to virtual rooms.

P027a


has 1 film 1
State formation and identity in conservation: exploring the relation 
Convenors:
Knut G Nustad (University of Oslo)
Marianne Elisabeth Lien (University of Oslo)
Send message to Convenors
Format:
Panel
Sessions:
Monday 25 October, 13:00-14:30

Short Abstract:

The panel explores how state bodies (including large NGOs) and people affected by conservation are constituted relationally through nature practices. We especially welcome papers that mobilise ethnographies for the purposes of comparison along a North-South dimension.

Long Abstract

Conflicts over conservation have often been explored with an emphasis on how nature is cast as external to local people, thereby justifying processes of dispossession. While building on such scholarship, this panel shifts the focus to how state bodies (including large NGOs) and people affected by conservation are constituted relationally through nature practices.

The politics of conservation are not only shaped by pre-existing notions of relational identities as regards natural resources (indigenous, colonial, peasant, squatter, citizen, etc.). Conservation also shapes identity formation, deepening some distinctions while glossing over others. In much of Southern Africa, for example, state conservation authorities cast people infringing on protected areas as poachers, foreign immigrants or squatters. In the Nordic Arctic, conservation efforts are justified through notions of commons, casting all citizens as equally benefitting in a way that disregards differences of senses of ownership and local ecological knowledge.

Different histories of state formation in relation to land ownership and use enable as well as preclude sets of identities. These identities thus emerge at the intersection of processes of conservation, identity and state formation. We invite papers that explore the relational and mutually constituting processes of people and state actors (including NGOs) in politics of conservation. We specifically welcome papers that mobilise ethnographies for the purposes of comparison along a North-South dimension, by paying specific attention to how relations between state formation, identities, conservation and nature practices have been constituted historically and continue to have effects today.

Accepted papers:

Panel Video visible to paid-up delegates