Accepted paper:

Rethinking 'wildness': knowledge and practice about animals among hunters in Borneo

Authors:

Yumi Kato (Kyoto University)

Paper short abstract:

I examine the factor of discrepancy between wildlife conservation at the national level and wildlife hunting, and eating customs at the local level. Then, I will consider how the lifestyle change is reflected in the people’s traditional ecological knowledge and recognition for the wild animals.

Paper long abstract:

The natural environments have greatly changed by large-scale logging and plantation development in the Insular Southeast Asia since 1960s. In regard to the degradation of forest, sustainable forest management and wildlife conservation have been carried out. In order to protect and conserve wild animals, the hunting ordinance was issued. Therefore, it is prohibited to hunt, eat, and trade wild animals freely. In this paper, I will examine how this hunting ordinance is understood, recognized, and practiced in local level. I will consider the factor of discrepancy between wildlife conservation in national level and wildlife hunting, eating customs in local level. In Sarawak, Malaysia, hunting ordinance was issued in 1998. At the same time, chicken farming project by the government was introduced in the villages as part of the food self-support program for not to depend on hunting. However, they did not easily stop conventional hunting and eat the animals which were bred. It is because of their preference for wildness, their consideration about health and life among dietary behavior. In this paper, I will discuss the transformation of the preference of wildness and consideration to health under the influence of the wildlife habitation transition caused by recent land use change. Furthermore, I will consider how the transformation of their social environment, including the lifestyle change by the increase of wage labor can be reflected in the traditional ecological knowledge and recognition for the wild animal.

panel P051
Hunting, animal welfare, and defence against wildlife attack (NME panel)