Accepted Paper:

Some considerations on the relationship between migration and kinship  

Author:

Igor Machado (Federal University of São Carlos)

Paper short abstract:

Kinship is one of the most significant dimensions of the relationships involving migration: it establishes complex networks and complex networks are also created as kinship. We see a complex intertwining of movement and kinship. We intend to explore some of these overlapping processes.

Paper long abstract:

This paper proposes a reflection on the connections between kinship and movements. Studying a considerable variety of movements, we realized that we always see kinship as one of the most significant dimensions of the relationships involving migration: kinship establishes complex networks and complex networks are also created as kinship. In one dimension (the "given" that Eduardo Viveiros de Castro points out) or another (the "constructed" assigned to constructivists), kinship affects and is affected by the people's movement. We see a complex intertwining of movement and kinship. We intend to explore some of these overlapping and offer contributions to think anthropology of migration, as well as anthropology in general, since we believe that these cases allow us to think beyond the usual categories of anthropological thought.

We will see a number of examples that allows us a more systematic reflection on the place of kinship in migration systems, or the opposite: the place of migration / movement in kinship systems. We came to a relevant question that we intend to address: kinship, understood by the relatedness bias is itself movement with which we deal (and therefore the opposite would also be possible)? To help answer this question, we will go through two stages in this paper: first return to the discussion of "diferencialities" and its implications, and then connect the examples and their specific kinship with a reflection on the "diferencialities" and their connections with kinship and subsequently with movement.

Panel P032
Transnational migration, kinship and relatedness