Accepted paper:

Local Owners: the Role of Traditional Leadership in Present-day Local Peace-building Processes in Nigeria.

Author:

Blessing Onyinyechi Fubara (University of Humanistic Studies Utrecht, Netherlands)

Paper short abstract:

My PhD project is an interdisciplinary research that explores the role of traditional leadership in present-day local peace-building processes in Nigeria, through a single-case study approach. Particular attention is given to the role of officially-recognized traditional leaders at community level.

Paper long abstract:

The impact of the role of traditional authority in social cohesion in Africa has been argued to be a significant determinant of the extent to which the local environment becomes sustainably peaceful. Despite increasing interest for indigenous actors in peace-building processes, the role of traditional leaders in local peace-building receives little empirical attention. This project is an interdisciplinary research that explores the role of traditional leaders in local peace efforts. The main purpose of the research is to explore how the role of traditional leaders can influence present-day peace-building initiatives. Further to this, the research looks at how their role can contribute to an ideal longer-term vision that can facilitate sustainable peace, thus increasing knowledge of peace initiatives in theory and practice. While it is important exploring the peace-building role of traditional leaders throughout the African continent, my research focuses on the rural Eastern Nigeria, specifically Ngwa community. By using anthropological approach, particular attention is given to the role of officially-recognized traditional leaders (also known as Eze) at community level. The conference lecture will be structured on why the research conceptually links local ownership with traditional leadership in peace-building processes in Nigeria.

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The meaning(s) of local ownership in and for sustainable peace-building