Accepted paper:

The Importance of Ethnographic Film/Video/Multi-media in the Development and Assessement of Anthropological Understanding [provisional title]

Authors:

Felicia Hughes-Freeland (SOAS)

Paper short abstract:

This paper presents findings based on practical teaching and examining experiences over the past 27 years, including the website and other results from funded research into the assessment of undergraduate video and multimedia projects, and asks if the time has come to define ethnographic film.

Paper long abstract:

This paper presents findings based on a range of practical experiences over the past 27 years: as a documentary student in film school; as module designer and convenor of an undergraduate visual anthropology; as examiner of Visual Anthropology Masters degrees in two British universities; and as a selector and judge at most of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Northern Ireland's International Ethnographic fim festivals, and as a selector at the Göttingen International Ethnographic Film Festival. Questions that have long been with me are whether we should define ethnographic film, and what the criteria for ethnographic as opposed to documentary and/or art film shoud be. This paper will draw on the website and other the results of funded research into the assessment of undergraduate video and multimedia projects to discuss these issues and to argue for the importance of including narrative video projects for undergraduateassessment as well as the now ubiquitous power-point presentations.

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