Accepted paper:

Indigenous knowledge in agriculture and allied fields: a strategic tool for sustaining food security and ecological balance

Authors:

Pritishri Parhi (College of Home Science)

Paper short abstract:

We need to get food security and ecological balance through ITK which has been by a research for ways to make agriculture sustainable and methodology for finding the sustainability. The indigenous people still stick to traditional technology and those technologies will maintain ecological balance.

Paper long abstract:

This paper argues that we need to get food security and ecological balance through ITK in a sustainable fashion. There is a research for ways to make agriculture sustainable; it is because the fantasy built up around industrial agriculture over decades has been rudely shaken. A methodology for finding the sustainability through ITK is discussed. It is observed that the indigenous people still stick to traditional technology for their food security and those technologies will maintain ecological balance too. The farmers use wood ash to kill the soil borne insects, they lit the fire at the corner of their rice field to get rid of gundhi bug; for treatment of wounded fish they apply turmeric paste on them; dry neem leaves, contain Azadirachtin, are used in storage of pulses; these are few among many of eco-friendly practices which farmers follow and are sustainable as well. From prehistoric time Indigenous peoples have depended, upon local environments for the provision of a variety of resources; they have developed a stake in conserving, and in many cases, enhancing the biodiversity. They are aware that biological diversity is a crucial factor in generating the ecological services and natural resources on which they depend. It is thus crucial that the ITK of a given locality forms the substrate on which food and ecological balance measures are developed to meet the economic and environmental challenges of the modern world.

panel PE03
Food and environmental security: the imperatives of indigenous knowledge systems