Accepted paper:

The Vanishing Tribals in Bangladesh: A Reflection on the Northern Plain

Authors:

Md. Abdur Rahman Siddiquee (University of Rajshahi)

Paper short abstract:

The objective of this paper is to investigate and analyse the factors that has threatened the socio- cultural existence of the small ethnic groups in the northern plain. A few of these tribal communities are considerably large enough while some others are microscopic minority embedded in the local large communities. The main tribal communities in the northern plains are the Santals, the Oraons, the Mahali, Munda, Malpahari, Palia Koch etc. They are turning into victims of development. This paper is based on extensive field work supported by some case studies. An over all socio-economic development is the prime motive of the government of this new nation state. So, more and more land is being taken under plough, new industrial estate/parks are coming up in the forest zone. Jungles are being rapidly cleared for the interest of modernization and development. As a consequence of deforestation the jurisdiction of the tribals are quickly shrinking and obviously the traditional life style is disappearing. They are gradually loosing the solitude of traditional Jungle life, the scope of hunting games and collecting fruits and vegetables from nature. Above all they are loosing their traditional religious rites and beliefs-animistic ideas and objects, role and functions, spiritual stand and forgetting popular ceremonies and festivals observed through generations.

Paper long abstract:

The objective of this paper is to investigate and analyse the factors that has threatened the socio- cultural existence of the small ethnic groups in the northern plain. A few of these tribal communities are considerably large enough while some others are microscopic minority embedded in the local large communities. The main tribal communities in the northern plains are the Santals, the Oraons, the Mahali, Munda, Malpahari, Palia Koch etc. They are turning into victims of development. This paper is based on extensive field work supported by some case studies. An over all socio-economic development is the prime motive of the government of this new nation state. So, more and more land is being taken under plough, new industrial estate/parks are coming up in the forest zone. Jungles are being rapidly cleared for the interest of modernization and development. As a consequence of deforestation the jurisdiction of the tribals are quickly shrinking and obviously the traditional life style is disappearing. They are gradually loosing the solitude of traditional Jungle life, the scope of hunting games and collecting fruits and vegetables from nature. Above all they are loosing their traditional religious rites and beliefs-animistic ideas and objects, role and functions, spiritual stand and forgetting popular ceremonies and festivals observed through generations.

panel SE03
Indigenous culture at the cross roads in the Indian subcontinent