Accepted paper:

Origin and development of pottery and agriculture in Middle Ganga Plain: possible affinities with East Asia and Southeast Asia

Author:

Kulbhushan Mishra (University of Delhi)

Paper short abstract:

This paper is an attempt to understand the origin and development of pottery making tradition and agriculture in Middle Ganga Plain and adjoining regions of eastern India and to explore possible cultural connections with East Asia and Southeast Asia.

Paper long abstract:

The earliest existence of pottery making tradition and agricultural practices in Middle Ganga plain is demonstrated from Neolithic horizon. Origin of pottery-making and agriculture have been the most important phenomena to understand the socio-economic and religious aspects; and the food habits of humankind. The distribution pattern of cord-marked pottery as a dominant ceramic ware associated with rice agriculture and polished stone tools in the prehistoric context of Middle Ganga plain and adjoining regions of eastern India, East Asia and Southeast Asia, indicate the possibility of cultural affinities of the prehistoric people inhabiting over the wide area of these regions. The study will be based on available archaeological, palaeobotanical, ethnographic and genetic evidences. The Gangetic plain has a significant position in the history and archaeology of India as it has been the nerve centre of cultural and religious upheavals. Middle Ganga plain, occupying central position in the Indo-Gangetic plain exhibits a wide range of alluvial geomorphic features. In recent years rapid efforts have been made to understand the archaeology of this region. Considering the presence of wild and domesticated varieties of rice species at Lahuradeva and other sites, and the existence of other cultivated crops with developed agricultural practices, it is logical to examine the role of this region in the origin and development of agriculture.

panel P10
On the prehistoric cultural relations of Southeast Asia with Northeast India