Accepted paper:

Newly discovered Mon inscribed images and slabs from Burma and Thailand

Author:

Christian Bauer (Humboldt University, Berlin)

Paper short abstract:

Since the last EurASEAA 14 conference in 2012 new Mon inscribed artefacts (images, stupas, glazed tiles, slabs) have been discovered in Burma, Thailand and Western collections. These epigraphs throw new light on the art, religious, and linguistic history of the first millenium CE up to the 15th c.

Paper long abstract:

Since the EurASEAA 14 conference in 2012 in Dublin new Mon inscribed artefacts have been discovered in the field in Burma and Thailand as well as in Western museum and private collections. These epigraphs throw new light on the art, religious, and linguistic history of the first millenium CE up to the 15th c. Inscriptions to be presented and discussed include: (1) a new multilingual 11th c. inscription from Kyaukse district (Central Burma), of which the Mon face -- the longest text of this slab -- will be reviewed in detail; (2) newly identified 12th c. votive images from Saraphi district, Northern Thailand, representing "The Greatest and Foremost Disciples" of the Etadaggavagga, Aṅguttara Nikāya; (3) inscribed 8th/9th c. miniature stupas from Nakhorn Sawan, Northwest Thailand, their connections to votive images from Mahasarakham and their relation to Gandharan Buddhist reliquaries; (4) 15th c. glazed tiles of the "Mara's daughters" series from the Shwegugyi-Ajapala site in Pegu, Burma; a now comprehensive list of 43 images held in seven collections worldwide has been compiled and a text typology established.

panel P11
Southeast Asian epigraphy: new discoveries and current research