Accepted paper:

Trafficking: The Abuse of Children And Women, A Socio-Cultural Menace In The Nigerian Urban Space

Authors:

Sunday Babalola (Joseph Ayo Babalola University)

Paper short abstract:

This study examines the abuse of children and women within the socio- cultural context of Nigerian urban space. In this perspective, it discusses the use of under age children for streets and malls trading. It also examines the abuse of female children and women in the illicit sex business.

Paper long abstract:

Africa, like any other continent in the world, is fast becoming urbanized, and the extent at which the continent is fast developing in the sphere of towns, cities and mega cities is highly commendable. It is a believable opinion that, urbanization, going by its history and culture of development in any given geographical location, is not without its own attendant vices. In this world-view, this study, "Trafficking: The Abuse of Children and Women, a Socio-Cultural Menace in the Nigerian Urban Space", undergoes a study of the abuse of children and women within the socio- cultural context of Nigerian urban space. In this perspective, it discusses the use of under age children for streets and malls petty trading activities. It also touches on the abuse of young female children and women in the illicit sex business. The historical, religious and philosophical underlining factors which attributed to the rise and a steady development of these socio vices were considered. The study is empirical and phenomenological in that it depends mostly on conclusion drawn from observable events of actual abuse and degradation of children and young women. To ensure a concrete analysable study backed up with primary data, both questionnaires and interviews method of investigation were adopted. To this end, one hundred people, who were randomly selected responded to questionnaires and twelve people that were carefully selected responded to interviews. The study makes use of simple descriptive method of analysis to collate, analyse and project its findings.

panel P157
Non-Penal Confinement in Africa