Accepted paper:

Sino - Zimbabwe relations: testing Samir Amin's thesis on international capitalism

Authors:

Ushehwedu Kufakurinani (University of Zimbabwe)

Paper short abstract:

In the far more recent years the Chinese have established a stronger linker that is far more economic and their presence in the Zimbabwe can be felt in different. This has triggered scholars to interpret the meanings of such a relationship which has duplicated the dependency on the West

Paper long abstract:

In contemporary history, the Chinese have been known to help the Zimbabwe people to fight the liberation struggle. In the far more recent years the Chinese have established a stronger linker that is far more economic and their presence in the country can be felt in different economic spaces that include mining, retail and even agriculture. This relationship has triggered scholars to interpret the meanings of such a relationship which, more ways than one, has duplicated the dependency on the West and replicated core-periphery relations. It is within this context that this study seeks to test Samir Amin's on international capitalism using the case of SINO-Zimbabwe relations. Samir Amin has played a critical role in shaping academia in the discourse of dependency. His ideas on international capitalism, core-periphery relations, historical materialism have had wide application and followers. Equally, there have also received a fair share of criticism. A number of scholars have come to interpret Sino-Africa relations in general and Sino-Zimbabwe relations in particular as constituting another round of plunder in which relations of dependency have been replicated. The result of this, it is argued, is recurrent development crises afflicting many African states. Chinese presence in Africa, here trade relations have been seen within the context of neo-imperialism.

panel Econ27
Changing structural conditions in the periphery: African connections and disruptions within the global economy (towards Samir Amin's festschrift)