Accepted paper:

The disappearance of the Second World, "suitcase science" - polish higher education reform and exclusion of technoscientific perspective

Authors:

Andrzej Wojciech Nowak (Adam Mickiewicz University)

Paper short abstract:

Paper aims to show the semi-peripheral context of the functioning of knowledge. Will be shown that lack of STS perspective in polish reform of higher education is correlated with the disappearance of the Second World - alternative, sovereign networks of stabilisation of reality and knowledge

Paper long abstract:

The presentation aims to show the semi-peripheral context of knowledge. The concept of " science in suitcase " (Abriszewski, Nowak et. al) will be used as the research perspective. It is an extension of B. Latour's circulatory model of knowledge supplemented with analysis of the centre-periphery perspective. It will show the disruptions in the knowledge circuits and global structural violence and global dependence. The analysis will be based on the current reform of higher education in Poland case. Thesis of paper: one of the symptoms of semiperipherial knowledge (re)production is the absence of ontological, STS oriented analysis of knowledge circulation. As a result debate is focused on science as a "cargo cult". Due to this, polish debate is characterised by clash between neoliberal "realism" vs neo-luddite and technophobic counter voices. This semiperipherial positions are functional to global distributions of power. Lack of STS, ontologically oriented analysis of circulation of knowledge is correlated with the disappearance of the Second World - alternative, sovereign networks of stabilisation of reality and knowledge. This leads to pessimistic diagnosis of situation of knowledge production in Poland as a semiperipherial country. There is a need for a change at the political, economic, and institutional level. Without redefining the position of the region, inquiring about the possibility of a more autonomous position it would be impossible to defeat "suitcase science" and in produce knowledge without reproducing hegemonic relations . This leads to question: is it possible to reclaim those promises which were stabilized by the Second World?

panel E10
Geographies of knowledge production and legacy of postsocialist technoscience