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Accepted Paper:

Kinship troubles in Crimea (2014-)  
Vera Skvirskaja (University of Copenhagen)

Paper Short Abstract:

After the occupation of Crimea by Russia, the situation for many Ukrainian, Russian and Crimean Tatars families has been challenging, problematizing ideas about national belonging and self-identification. The paper discuss the impact of the annexation on kinship, belonging and new mobilities.

Paper Abstract:

After the military occupation and annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation, the situation for many Ukrainian, Russian and Crimean Tatars families in the region has been challenging. For some Russian settlers in Crimea, those who moved there in the late Soviet period, Russia’s taking over the peninsular was not particularly dramatic or was even a welcomed development. For many Ukrainian, Crimean Tatars and mixed families Russian occupation has problematized ideas about national collective belonging and individual self-identification. The paper discuss the impact of the annexation of Crimea on familial networks, negotiations of belonging and new mobilities. It also inquires about the ways in which new mobilities tend to undermine or strengthen kinship networks in the long run.

Panel P107
Doing and undoing kinship under military occupation
  Session 2 Tuesday 23 July, 2024, -