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OP304


Doing and undoing ethics, methods, and positionality in the anthropology of crime and criminalisation [AnthroCrime Network] 
Convenors:
Davide Casciano (University College London)
Lene Swetzer (The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID))
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Formats :
Panel
Mode :
Online
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Open to transfers

Short Abstract:

The scientific exploration of crime has traversed a path fraught with ethical complexities, and postmodern approaches introduce new ethical dilemmas for researchers. This panel aims to delve into these evolving ethical issues as they manifest in anthropological studies of crime and criminalised behaviours.

Long Abstract:

The scientific exploration of crime has traversed a path fraught with ethical complexities, often raising concerns about reinforcing criminalization and perpetuating the 'othering' of research subjects. Traditional positivist methodologies, aiming to quantify and categorize crime, have been criticised for their complicity in these dynamics. In contrast, postmodern approaches have advocated for a deeper understanding of crime's subjective meanings and experiences. While these shifts in epistemological paradigms have provided valuable insights, they have also introduced novel ethical complexities for researchers. These include navigating their own moral, legal, political, and emotional positionalities as they engage in fieldwork involving illegalised phenomena. This panel aims to delve into these evolving ethical complexities as they manifest in anthropological (or others) studies of crime and criminalised behaviours. We invite contributions that explore the intricacies of fieldwork in sensitive settings, examining how legal, moral, and emotional dimensions shape scientific work, reflexivity, institutional relations, legal boundaries, and epistemological frameworks. By shedding light on these complexities, we aim to contribute to broader discussions on the role of science in creating knowledge and the implications of knowledge production in the context of crime studies.

Accepted papers: