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Accepted Paper:

Shifted focus from "We" to "I": how the Avatime youth strive to be happy instead of being good enough (Ghana).  
Alina Lapushkina (Institute for African Studies)

Paper short abstract:

Transformation of understanding personhood in traditional societies, especially among female part, reflects a shifted paradigm of the image of womanhood and relationships between generations as a consequence of media influence, migration and basic education.

Paper long abstract:

Transformation of understanding personhood in traditional societies, especially among the female part, reflects a shifted paradigm of the image of womanhood and relationships between generations as a consequence of media influence, migration, and basic education. The definition of "child" in Avatime language still remains as "that one, who knows, what is good for the community". The word is used but the sense is not widely relevant in Avatime society anymore. Youth is focused on the images, which are transmitted via media and school books or brought from the vividly changing capital. Mothers frequently leave homeplaces in order to find work in the cities, when grandmothers take care of the children (Brydon, 2008). During our fieldwork in Ghana, we managed to observe how the margins of personhood were formed in children from early childhood as "collective values holders" but contemporaneous context adds its smell of attractive individualism - youth are trying to be "in pursue of own vocation" instead of following the traditional way.

Panel P161
Rethinking margins through personhood
  Session 1 Wednesday 22 July, 2020, -