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Accepted Paper:

Phantom masculinities: How conceptions of gender inform the far-right in London  

Author:

Amir Massoumian (SOAS University)

Paper short abstract:

The impetus of far-right populists to 'take back control' is often paired with a rational which associates the loss of control with a 'feminised west'. This research will investigate how conceptions of masculinity inform far-right groups living in London.

Paper long abstract:

"The people who are to blame most are ourselves, European men. Strong men do not get ethnically replaced, strong men do not allow their culture to degrade, strong men do not allow their people to die. Weak men have created this situation and strong men are needed to fix it." The

Great Replacement - Christchurch manifesto 


The focus of this anthropological doctoral research is on the far-right in London. The impetus of far-right populists to 'take back control' is often paired with a rational which associates the loss of control that carries a heavily gendered rhetoric. This involves far-right ideas which assert that the state has become 'feminised' and aims to remove traditional masculinity altogether. The ethnographic focus of this study is on understanding masculinities in relation to the shifts in cultural beliefs and practices that have occurred in London among three groups: UKIP, the think tank, and now media outlet, known as The New Culture Forum, and UK fringes of the alt-right. Despite an extensive body of scholarship on the far-right in Britain, we know far less about how people's experience of masculinity, specifically how gender identity is forged and negotiated by members of these groups. My research focuses on men and their experiences of masculinity, specifying how it is constructed, negotiated, and reproduced.

Panel P131
Getting 'the Right' right: Comparative ethnographies of neo-nationalist movements in Europe