Accepted paper:

Pushing through to the other side: The emergence of psychotherapeutic lines of investigation in the unfinished business of anthropology

Authors:

Salma Siddique (University of Aberdeen)

Paper short abstract:

W. H. R. Rivers worked at Cambridge university as a psychologist but returned from the anthropological expedition to the Torres straits as an ethnographer of a newly recognised genealogical method of recording observations of outer realities meeting inner worlds.

Paper long abstract:

W. H. R. RiversĀ“ work at Cambridge was established in the modernising Europe of the early 20th century. The intention of this paper is to explore the relationship between anthropology and psychotherapy (including psychoanalysis), informing the emerging ecology of knowledge of 'the other' as a whole new perspective. Rivers' approach incorporates different forms of knowledge and practice and was an important tool in helping people to make sense of the rapidly blurring boundaries and borders of their lives in European societies. He looked at how a sense of displacement and marginalisation helps interdisciplinary synergies in exploring and understanding psychotherapy and psychoanalysis in the creation of modern anthropological thinking within learned societies.

panel P049
The role of learned societies and associations in the creation and building of European anthropology [History of Anthropology Network]