Accepted Paper:

Long live my objects! Silent practices to delay divestment  

Author:

Tomas Errazuriz (Universidad Andres Bello)

Paper short abstract:

This research seeks to expose and analyze everday practices -widely known, but increasingly less common- that allow us to extend the lifespan of domestic objects. Especial attention is given to practices of resignification, such as maintenance, protection, repair, reuse and storage.

Paper long abstract:

While the literature is clear in warning about the prevalence of disposable goods and the shortening lifespan of those things we consume, less attention has been given to those things that remain and defy wear and programmed obsolescence. These are objects of diverse value, whose owners, moved by different motivations, manage to keep them for a longer period of time. Home appliances, ornaments, furniture, clothing, tableware, cooking utensils, plants, cleaning supplies, etc., can vary considerably in their time of permanence at home depending on who is responsible or takes care of them.

Through an ethnographic work in several homes in Santiago, Chile, this research seeks to expose and analyze several practices -widely known, but increasingly less common- that allow us to extend the life of everyday objects. Especial attention is given to everyday domestic practices of maintenance, protection, repair, reuse, storage and ownership change; which contribute to the permanence of objects at home through their resignification. Additionally, this research aims to discuss on the motivations that lead to the investment of time and other resources in objects.

Panel P114
Permanence: anthropologies of what stays