Accepted paper:

Risk perceptions and natural hazard management in the Brahmaputra floodplain (Assam, north-east India)

Author:

Emilie Cremin (CNRS)

Paper short abstract:

Our research aims to understand the complex ways in which different stakeholders (farmers, NGOs, and Governments) interact with and manage the effects of hydrogeomorphological dynamics in the Brahmaputra flood plain (Assam north-east India).

Paper long abstract:

In the state of Assam in Northeast India, the annual floods of the Brahmaputra River punctuate the lives of the floodplain's inhabitants. The Mising people, classified as a "Scheduled Tribe", have been dwelling in the Brahmaputra floodplain for centuries. They must cope with the unpredictability of the river, since they depend directly on the natural resources provided by the environment for their livelihood. Our research aims to understand the complex ways in which different stakeholders (farmers, NGOs, and Governments) interact with and manage the effects of hydrogeomorphological dynamics. That's why, we analyse how the Mising Tribe, the NGOs and the State perceive, respond and adapt to contemporary changes in the environment by comparing practices used to reduce flooding and mitigate the effects of erosion. The main results are presented as a typology of stakeholders' perceptions of natural hazards that includes the risk and resource management practices of different groups. We question the relevance of responses promoted by the government and NGOs as a means to assist the most vulnerable populations of the flood plain. It remains necessary to take into account local realities when implementing action plans for disaster management in order to shape effective solutions to improve rural livelihoods.

panel P095
Living with disasters: hazards, continuity and change