Accepted paper:

The Restitution of Cultural Assets from Belgian and French Ethnographic Museums: (Re)construction of Museums' Norms and Policies

Authors:

Damiana Otoiu (Bucharest University)

Paper short abstract:

It is an increasingly more present situation that ethnographic museums are faced with restitution requests. Dealing with such requests raises not only a series of historical, ethical and political interrogations, but also the need for coordinating heterogeneous and incoherent legislative frameworks.

Paper long abstract:

It is an increasingly more present situation that ethnographic museums are faced with restitution requests and claims for certain cultural assets, especially for objects having belonged to former colonies or indigenous peoples. Dealing with such requests raises not only a series of historical, ethical and political interrogations, but also the need for coordinating very heterogeneous and incoherent legislative frameworks. Subsequently, these peculiar restitution cases and the regulation of property rights over cultural assets become complex processes in which different actors, norms and types of legitimacy are brought together and confronted with one another. Starting from several restitution claims addressed to Musée Royal de l'Afrique Centrale (Bruxelles) and to Musée du Quai Branly (Paris), this paper will first enquire into the actors of the process of (re)construction of museums' norms and policies, (state institutions, NGOs, museographers, etc.). Second, the paper will analyse the process of norms' "framing": how these actors engage with the "great meta-narratives" of the past? And what are the main themes employed in justifying the "necessity of restitution", particularly the political-historical arguments? (restitution as synonymous with the recognition of former colonies' sovereignty, or with a reparation for colonial past's torts). Les musées ethnographiques se confrontent actuellement à des demandes de restitution de biens culturels, et particulièrement d'objets provenant d'anciennes colonies ou des peuples autochtones. Gérer ces demandes soulève des interrogations historiques, éthiques, politiques, mais aussi en termes de coordination de cadres législatifs hétérogènes ou incohérents. Différents acteurs, normes et légitimités se confrontent dans ce processus de « restitution » ou de reconnaissance du droit de propriété sur les biens culturels. À partir de quelques demandes de restitution, adressées au Musée Royal de l'Afrique Centrale (Bruxelles) et au Musée du Quai Branly (Paris), nous nous interrogeons premièrement sur les acteurs de cette (re)construction des normes et politiques muséales (des institutions étatiques, des ONG, des muséographes, etc). Deuxièmement, notre analyse portera sur le processus de « cadrage » : comment ces acteurs réinterprètent-ils les « grands métarécits » du passé? et quels sont les principaux thèmes invoqués pour justifier une « nécessaire restitution », notamment les arguments politico-historiques? (la restitution vue comme synonyme de la reconnaissance de la souveraineté des pays après la décolonisation, ou comme une réparation des torts du passé colonial).

panel W041
Regulating uncertainty: anthropological approaches to spaces of uncertainty in and of law [EN & FR]