Accepted paper:

The role of informal heritage learning for peace and reconciliation

Authors:

Lizzi Milligan (University of Bath)
Adebo Nelson Abiti (University of Western Cape)

Paper short abstract:

This paper will consider what learning about peace happens in heritage work and how this may be contextually evaluated. This is based on findings from the AHRC GCRF network 'Indicators for informal learning: a mobile heritage network for conflict-affected communities in Uganda'.

Paper long abstract:

There is growing expectation that heritage agencies and actors have a positive role to play in the prevention of conflict and post-conflict development. However, museums, memorials and other heritage spaces are often neglected in considerations of education, as they are informal sites where memory work is undertaken, separate from the formal school curriculum. This means that there is currently little understanding of the impact of informal heritage learning for sustained 'positive' or 'negative' peace (Galtung, 1967). In response to this, as academics and heritage practitioners, we have set up an AHRC-GCRF network 'Indicators for informal learning: a mobile heritage network for conflict-affected communities in Uganda'. This paper will consider (1) what learning about peace happens in heritage outreach projects in Northern Uganda and (2) what may be contextually appropriate ways to evaluate relevant learning outcomes. This will be based on thematic analysis of key reflections from workshops with academics, practitioners, policymakers and participant groups in Gulu and Kitgum (including ex-combatants, refugees, community leaders, women peace club members, abductees and survivors). Conclusions will consider the ways that education policy and practice in Uganda can 'open up' to recognise the informal learning happening at heritage sites and its potential significant role in education, peace and development.

back to panel O3
Stream:
Interrogating development through stories and experiences
History and development: practicing the past in pursuit of 'progress' [paper]