Accepted paper:

Artificiality of colonial boundary creation, socio-cultural multiplicities and healthcare seeking practices in African border communities

Authors:

Sakiru Raji (Lagos State University)

Paper short abstract:

The invasion and reconfiguration of African communities to states by colonial masters continued to be viewed as artificial borders and symbols of colonialism. This situation remain despite the long years of independence, rather it has further neo-colonized residence of border regions in Africa

Paper long abstract:

The invasion and reconfiguration of African communities to states by colonial masters continued to be viewed as artificial borders and symbols of colonialism which were created on the basis of political ethnocentrism and economic gains to the larger disadvantage of border inhabitants. This situation had not yet be reversed despite the long years of independence, rather it has further neo-colonized the residence of border regions in Africa. With these trends, to explain the developmental consequences of artificial boundaries on socio-cultural and healthcare practices of border communities in Southwest Nigeria, the transnationalism and socio-ecological model were adopted to guide the study. The study purposively selected residents of border-communities of Seme, Ilara and Okerete in Southwest Nigeria, using exploratory research-design. Narrative data were generated using eighteen Key Informant Interviews and thirty Focus Group Discussions. The study findings revealed that border residents were currently experiencing identity crisis, a high rate of criminality, and discriminatory infrastructural neglect. These incidences were originated in colonial era and continued to post-independent successive government. The consequences of colonialism and neo-colonialism had an adverse effects on border residence; therefore, policies that de-compose the effects of neo-colonialism and emphasis access to better health and social infrastructural development should be encouraged.

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Stream:
Disrupting health research
Decolonising health research for development [paper]