Accepted paper:

Decolonizing heritage ownership for common good in South Africa

Authors:

Morgan Ndlovu (University of South Africa)

Paper short abstract:

One of the challenging questions facing the South African heritage industry is the question of whether it is possible for the country's heritage resources to serve the interests of the majority while in 'private hands' or such resources can serve the interest of majority when in public ownership.

Paper long abstract:

One of the challenging questions facing the South African heritage industry today is the question of whether it is possible for the country's heritage resources to serve the interests of the majority while in 'private hands' or such heritage resources require public ownership and control in order to serve the interests of the majority. This question is quite important not only because the idea of 'heritage' always invokes a sense of ownership and/or control by more than one individual and/or generation but also because the ownership patterns of heritage resources can either enhance or diminish a country's response to a number of developmental challenges that include among them poverty, inequality and nation-building. In this paper, I argue that the ownership of heritage resources can either advance or negative the cause of common good among the people of South Africa. Thus, I examine the role of private ownership of heritage resources in advancing common good among the people of South Africa with a view of informing evidence-based policy.

back to panel O3
Stream:
Interrogating development through stories and experiences
History and development: practicing the past in pursuit of 'progress' [paper]