Accepted Paper:

Movement for aesthetics or health?: body movement of 'wa' in traditional Japanese culture  

Author:

Yuri Nonami (Otemae University)

Paper short abstract:

In traditional Japanese culture, there are common slow body movements such as “suri-ashi” in Zeami and Budo. Recently they are introduced and practiced in health care exercises. This paper examines how these body movements are perceived and embodied by audiences as well as performers, practitioners.

Paper long abstract:

In traditional Japanese culture, there are some common slow body movements such as "suri-ashi" (sliding one's feet), "ashi-sabaki" (footwork) and "te-sabaki" (handling). These body movements have been performed in Zeami plays (Noh performance) and practiced Budo (Japanese martial arts) for centuries. Recently they are introduced and practiced in health care exercises in order to improve health mentally, spiritually as well as physically.

This paper examines how these body movements are perceived and embodied by audiences as well as performers, practitioners. How do audiences and performers of Zeami plays perceive as sensory experiences subjectively and objectively? How are practitioners of Budo embodied as lived experiences of moving bodies subjectively and objectively? How are the practitioners of health care exercises embodied differently from the practitioners of Budo through the slow body movements? How do these audiences, performers and practitioners share the same field? They are explored from the viewpoint of health care and healing.

Panel MB-AMS03
Life in movement: becomings of the bodies