Accepted paper:

Casado's Legacy

Author:

Valentina Bonifacio (Ca' Foscari University of Venice)

Paper short abstract:

For 100 years Maskoy people worked in Carlos Casado’s tannin factory. The factory, which had been founded on their land, based its production on the exploitation of local natural resources. After exploiting the territory, the company closed the factory and sold the land. For Maskoy people who fought against the company to repossess their former territory, Casado’s legacy is a land without food. On this land, they have to rebuild their life, and in doing so, have to come to terms with their past and their dreams. 49' film and 15’ filmmaker-led discussion

Paper long abstract:

For 100 years Maskoy people worked in Carlos Casado's tannin factory. The factory, which had been founded on their land, based its production on the exploitation of local natural resources. After exploiting the territory, the company closed the factory and sold the land. Focusing on dialogues and encounters between the Maskoy and other people we get to know their past and dreams, and the role of non-indigenous politicians in shaping the present and future of their lives.

Three stories develop in parallel during the film: a long walk through Casado's abandoned factory and house, a female initiation ritual (the first one after a gap of many years) and a trip of the Maskoy leaders to the capital city of Paraguay (Asuncion).

Casado's legacy - a land without food - is a common one for many peoples all around the world. As such, what takes shape through the experiences and challenges of a small group of indigenous people in a remote part of Paraguay has a universal resonance.

At the same time, the film also portrays the encounter between the anthropologist (and film-maker) and the people with whom she lived for almost a year, looking at their struggles in building their future, but also evoking the happiness of everyday life.

49' film and 15’ filmmaker-led discussion

panel P43
Film programme