Accepted paper:

High country hospitality

Author:

Donna Keen (University of Otago)

Paper short abstract:

This paper deals with the way in which the notions of host and guest are subverted and questions the ethics of providing hospitality.

Paper long abstract:

The notion of home is often centred on ownership of land. Therefore, in these cases the person or group occupying the land can argue or be seen to have the greatest legitimacy to claim belonging and the right to perform the role of host. This paper deals with the debate over land ownership within the High Country pastoral land of the South Island, New Zealand. The tenure of this land is held by pastoral farmers who claim not only a legal but cultural connection to the land (Dominy 1995) However; the land is rented on a long term lease from the government. The government is currently reviewing the current tenure, as a result of increasing pressure from other groups who desire greater access and protection of the land. This example illustrates a political process by which various groups try to legitimatise their right to belong and hence have greater access to the land. Contributors to this debate often utilise examples of acts of hospitality performed by them or for them to reflect the right to belong. This paper hence deals with the way in which the notions of host and guest are subverted and questions the ethics of providing hospitality.

panel P25
At home in mobility: ethics of hospitality and belonging