Accepted Papers:

Disowning Cultures, Disentangling Natures  

Author:

Michael Goldsmith (University of Waikato)

Paper Short Abstract:

This paper will analyse the issue of replication by examining 'disownership claims'. These include refusals to replicate, proposals to disentangle replication, regrets over previous replication, and suggestions to antagonists that they go replicate themselves.

Paper long abstract:

This paper will analyse the issue of replication by examining 'disownership claims'. These include refusals to replicate, proposals to disentangle replication, regrets over previous replication, and suggestions to antagonists that they go replicate themselves.

In New Zealand (and probably also in other post-colonial settler societies), the sorts of texts in question achieve particular salience at moments of heightened tension when indigenous and settler claims to citizenship and property are contested more virulently than usual. In 2004, for example, in the aftermath of Brash's Orewa speech and at the height of the foreshore and seabed controversy, New Zealanders on opposing sides of the political debates engaged in wrangling over who had benefited from European 'civilisation' and by how much. On one view, some non-Maori asserted that if Maori wanted to claim the foreshore and seabed (the patrimony of 'all New Zealanders') then they should 'return' various items of cultural and technological progress that accompanied colonialism. Conversely, some Maori and their supporters asserted that if Pakeha insisted on reclaiming the goods that they had brought, then they should take back the associated ills of civilisation as well. When the list of cultural exchanges and replications runs out, it is readily supplemented by examples drawn from the natural environment. The locally situated occurrence of such arguments should not be allowed to disguise the fact they have specific antecedents in the genealogy of colonial and counter-colonial discourse (especially, no doubt, at moments of decolonisation).

panel P08
The dilemma of replication