Timetable


Time zone: UTC+1

- 09:45

The following colleagues opened the conference:

Carel Stolker portrait

Prof. Carel Stolker (Leiden University)
Carel Stolker has been Rector Magnificus and President of the Executive Board of Leiden University since 2013. In 2016 he was appointed for a second term by the Board of Governors, for the period from 2017 to 2021. Stolker is a Professor of Private Law.

Rajesh Rawal portrait

Rajash Rawal (Haagse Hogeschool)
Rajash Rawal is an Executive Board member of The Hague University of Applied Science. Rajash studied Government and Policy in Europe at the University of Teesside (United Kingdom). He obtained his master's degree in European Studies (specialization Political Science) at the University of Amsterdam.

Tijmen Rooseboom portrait

Tijmen Rooseboom (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, Special Ambassador for Youth, Education and Work)
Tijmen Rooseboom is the Ambassador for Youth at the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, focusing on education and work. This position emphasizes the importance of ‘youth’ in the policy of the Ministy for Foreign Trade and Development Coordination.The Dutch policy will mainly focus on ‘giving perspective to youth’ by improving education, especially 21st century skills, and youth employment. Before this position Tijmen Rooseboom was the Deputy Ambassador to Somalia and he worked for the Dutch development bank FMO, the EU and the UN.


The session will be chaired by Jan-Bart Gewald and David Ehrhardt.

Jan-Bart Gewald portrait

Prof. Jan-Bart Gewald is Director of the African Studies Centre Leiden as of 1 September 2017. He is Professor of African History and is specialized in the social history of Africa. His research has ranged from the ramifications of genocide in Rwanda and Namibia, through to the socio-cultural parameters of trans-desert trade in Africa. In addition, he has conducted research on pan-Africanism in Ghana, spirit possession in the Republic of Niger, Dutch development cooperation, Africa in the context of globalisation, and social history in Eritrea. For the past 15 years his prime research focus has been on the socio-cultural history of central Africa. On a personal note, Jan-Bart grew up in Africa and has lived in Botswana, Congo Kinshasa, Eritrea, Ghana, Namibia, Niger, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.


David Ehrhardt portrait

David Ehrhardt is an Associate Professor in International Development at Leiden University College in The Hague. He is co-chair of the Leiden African Studies Assembly. David teaches African studies and development, and his research focuses on local governance for development, particularly in Nigeria, as well as food sustainability and educational innovation.

- 10:15

Freddy Weima (NUFFIC)

Keynote address:
Rethinking the higher education ecosystem

Freddy Weima (1971) is Director-General of Nuffic, the Dutch organisation for internationalisation and international cooperation in education. He took up this position in 2012.

Nuffic works from primary and secondary education to vocational and higher education and research. Together with national and international partners, Nuffic strives to promote the development of pupils and students, as well as the growth of teachers, professionals and organisations. Among many other tasks, Nuffic supports Erasmus Plus, the big European education programme; Orange Knowledge, a capacity building programme commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs; the Study in Holland campaign; diploma recognition and bilingual education in primary, secondary and vocational education. Apart from the headquarters in The Hague, Nuffic is responsible for eleven offices all over the world in countries like China, Indonesia and South Africa.

Before Nuffic, Freddy worked at the Labour Market unit of CAOP – the knowledge and services centre for labour issues in the public domain. Freddy studied political science at the University of Amsterdam and the San Francisco State University. He started his career as a political science lecturer at the University of Amsterdam, after which he joined the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. Later on, he also worked at the ministries of Social Affairs and Justice.

- 10:45

Prof. Etienne Ehouan Ehile (AAU General Secretary)

Keynote address:
“The Association of African Universities: reflections on decolonizing minds”

Le professeur Etienne EHILE est le secrétaire général de l'Association des universités africaines/ Professor Etienne EHILE is the Secretary General of the Association of African Universities.

Le professeur Etienne EHILE est ivoirien et un physiologiste renommé. Il est diplômé de la Faculté des Sciences de l'Université d'Abidjan en 1974, où il a obtenu son diplôme de Maitrise. Il rejoint ensuite l'Université d'Aix Marseille III (France) et obtient son Doctorat en Neurophysiologie avec mention en 1978. Ses travaux de recherche sont menés au Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), France.
Il est l'ancien Directeur de Cabinet du Ministère de la Santé et de l'Hygiène Publique de Côte d'Ivoire et ancien Président de l'Université Nangui Abrogoua, Côte d'Ivoire, où il a passé deux mandats de 4 ans chacun (2001-2010), avant d’occuper ses fonctions de secrétaire général de l'Association des universités africaines (AUA) en août 2011. Le professeur EHILE n'est pas nouveau à l'AUA car il est membre actif du conseil d'administration de l'AUA depuis 2005.
Le professeur EHILE a publié plus de 50 articles scientifiques dans diverses revues scientifiques régionales et internationales de 1978 à 2019. De 1992 à ce jour, le professeur EHILE a occupé de nombreux postes de direction et d'administration.

Prof Etienne Ehouan Ehile is an Ivorian and a renowned physiologist. He graduated from the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Abidjan in 1974, where he obtained his Master's degree. He then joined the University of Aix Marseille III (France) and obtained his Doctorate in Neurophysiology with honors in 1978. His research work was carried out at the Neurophysiology Laboratory of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France.
He is the former Director of Cabinet of the Ministry of Health and Public Hygiene of Côte d'Ivoire and former President of Nangui Abrogoua University, Côte d'Ivoire, where he spent two terms of 4 years each ( 2001-2010), before assuming his duties as Secretary General of the Association of African Universities (AAU) in August 2011. Professor Ehile is not new to the AAU because he was an active member of the board of directors of the AAU since 2005.
Professor Ehile has published over 50 scientific articles in various regional and international scientific journals from 1978 to 2019. From 1992 to date, Professor Ehile has held numerous management and administrative positions.

- 11:00 Coffee break
- 12:15

See the roundtable's poster and summary.

View the details here.

- 13:00

Dr Mustapha Mekideche (Former Chair of the APRM of the AU)

Keynote address:
Inclusive sustainable development in Africa: what breakthrough strategies and what new approaches are needed?

Keynote will be in French, Q&A later on will be intermediated by Nouria Ouibrahim

Download the EN version of this presentation

Ex vice-président et membre fondateur du Conseil National Economique et Social (CNES) d’Algérie/ Former vice-president and founding member of the National Economic and Social Council (CNES) of Algeria.

Mustapha MEKIDECHE est licencié en mathématiques de l’Université d’Alger et docteur en économie de l’Université de Grenoble 2. Il a été membre puis Président de 2012 à 2017 du Panel du Mécanisme africain d’évaluation par les pairs (MAEP) auprès de l’Union Africaine (UA). Il a effectué sa carrière dans le secteur des hydrocarbures comme directeur des zones industrielles de Skikda et d’Arzew pour la Sonatrach puis comme conseiller du ministre de l’énergie et enfin comme fondateur et directeur général de l’entreprise nationale d’engineering pétrolier (ENEP). A ce titre il a été membre fondateur et Vice President de l’UNEP. Il a exercé depuis 1998, comme consultant indépendant dans les secteurs de l’industrie . Il est actuellement Président du Business Club Algeria-Japan.

Mustapha Mekideche holds a degree in mathematics from the University of Algiers and a doctorate in economics from the University of Grenoble 2. He was a member and then Chairman from 2012 to 2017 of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) Panel at the African Union (AU). He carried out his career in the hydrocarbons sector as director of the industrial zones of Skikda and Arzew for Sonatrach then as advisor to the Minister of Energy and finally as founder and general manager of the national company of petroleum engineering (ENEP). In this capacity he was a founding member and Vice President of UNEP. He has worked since 1998 as an independent consultant in industrial sectors. He is currently President of the Algeria-Japan Business Club.

- 13:40

An introduction into Wikipedia and its sister projects like Wikidata. A talk about their importance for the dissemination of knowledge on Africa and the visibility of Africa research. How can academics contribute and what are the benefits for their research? How can African Studies Centres easily share their image collections with the world via Wiki?

Jos Damen & Ursula Oberst, African Studies Centre Leiden.

- 14:00

The country knowledge profiles (https://www.africaknows.eu/country-profiles/) include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 14:30

Prof. Sabelo Ndlovu Gatsheni (Bayreuth)

Keynote address:
The Cognitive Empire in Africa: Knowledge, Consciousness, and Epistemic Freedom

Currently Full Professor and Chair of Epistemologies of the Global South with Emphasis on Africa at the University of Bayreuth in Germany.

Previously, Prof. Ndlovu-Gatsheni worked as Research Professor and Director of Scholarship at the Department of Leadership and Transformation at the University of South Africa (UNISA). He previously worked as Acting Executive Director of Change Management Unit in the Vice-Chancellor’s Office at the University of South Africa.

He is also the founder of the Africa Decolonial Research Network (ADERN) based at the University of South Africa. In 2007, he was a Visiting Fellow at the African Studies Centre in Leiden, the Netherlands.

Professor Ndlovu-Gatsheni has over a hundred publications to his name. Among his key works on decolonialization are: Empire, Global Coloniality and African Subjectivity (New York & Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2013); Decolonizing the University, Knowledge Systems and Disciplines (North Carolina, Carolina Academic Press, 2016) co-edited with Siphamandla Zondi; and Epistemic Freedom in Africa: Deprovincialization and Decolonization (London & New York: Routledge, 2018). His latest publication is Decolonization, Development and Knowledge in Africa: Turning Over A New Leaf (Routledge, 2020).

- 16:30
- 20:32

Documentary film, 32 mins, by Ras Mutabaruka, 2020

This documentary examines the scientific capabilities of the African continent and the contribution of the Africans and the African diaspora. It is a quest for the origins of science in Africa, the influence of colonialism and slavery on the development of science up to the present day.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 22:05

Documentary film, 79mins, by Matthias De Groof, 2018

While disassembling the metre-high statue of Leopold II, his ghost wanders through the corridors and halls of the museum. The renovation of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (now Africa Museum) in Tervuren (Belgium) is an opportunity to give a modern interpretation to the museum's existence and mission. The stuffed wild animals, the traditional masks and the dusted artifacts are to make way for a more complete, modern view on Africa. The museum calls on the help of experts and initiates consultations with representatives of African organisations that have joined forces in a structure set up for this purpose, COMRAF. Exhibiting the minerals from the Congolese soil is no longer just a matter of scientific explanation. We must also consider the horrific conditions in which these raw materials were mined and the disruptive consequences for Congolese society. But in order to completely dislodge the majestic building from its colonial form, more fundamental questions also need to be asked. Who is looking at whom here? And whose story is being told here? This film documents the renovation of the Africa Museum as a process of aesthetic mourning, shows the complexity of its transformation and reveals through the eyes of the African diaspora in Belgium what the renovation really puts at stake: the decolonization of the Self.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 10:45
- 11:00 Coffee break
- 11:30

Dr Chika Esiobu (2019 Influential person of African Descent under 40)

Keynote address:
“Deconstructing and Reconstructing the African’s Mindset: Strategies, Platforms and Projected Impact.”

Download the presentation (PDF)

Dr. Chika Ezeanya Esiobu holds a Ph.D. in African Studies from Howard University in Washington D.C. Dr Ezeanya Esiobu’s intellectual work is centrally located within the conviction that Africa’s indigenous knowledge is key to the continent’s advancement.

Dr Ezeanya Esiobu has been invited to present her ideas across cultures, countries, institutions and platforms, including Yale University, London School of Economics, United Nations, African Union, Social Science Research Council, Standard Bank South Africa, Project Management Institute of Africa, to mention few. Dr Ezeanya Esiobu has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, the International Development Research Center (IDRC) Canada, the United Nations, the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida), and the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC).

In 2019, Dr Ezeanya Esiobu was recognized as an influential person of African descent under 40. She is the author of Indigenous Knowledge and Education in Africa (Springer: 2019), in addition to numerous academic articles, book chapters and essays on Africa’s advancement. Dr Ezeanya Esiobu is the founder of African Child Press and is currently a visiting honorary professor with the University of Rwanda.

- 12:45
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 14:00

The country knowledge profiles include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 14:30

Prof. Erika Kraemer-Mbula (University of Johannesburg)

Keynote address:
Harnessing home-grown innovations for transformative change in Africa

College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg

Professor of Economics and Chairholder of the DST/NRF/Newton Fund Trilateral Chair in Transformative Innovation, the Fourth Industrial Revolution and Sustainable Development, at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa.

Her work focuses on alternative development paths for African economies. She specialises in the analysis of innovation systems in connection to equitable development and inclusive development, and has done pioneering work on innovation in the informal sector. Trained as an Economist, she holds a Masters in Science and Technology Policy by the Science and Policy Research Unit (University of Sussex), and a doctorate in Development Studies from the University of Oxford. Her latest book: Kraemer-Mbula et. al. (2020). Transforming Research Excellence: New Ideas from the Global South. African Minds.

- 15:45
- 16:00 Coffee break
- 17:30
- 20:18

Documentary film, 18 mins, by Awa Farah, Alice Aedy, 2020

Writer and producer Awa Farah and filmmaker Alice Aedy made a documentary to express her experiences as a British-Somali woman at Cambridge University. Awa had become increasingly irritated by what she saw as a stereotypical depiction of Somali people and, more widely, black, Muslim women. Against the backdrop of the Black Lives Matter movement, and with elite universities under attack for their poor diversity records, Somalinimo follows the conversations of Awa and three other Cambridge University students, Miske Ali, Hafsa Said and Samiya Dubed. The women talk about their immigrant parents, discuss their heritage, unpack identity conflicts and find solidarity in what might have been an intimidating and isolating environment. Somalinimo is also a love-letter to Somali culture: with a distinctive visual approach, it takes us inside one of the most traditional institutions in the UK as well as a the set design of a traditional Somali home, to evoke a powerful sense of nostalgia.

- 22:00

Feature film, 90 mins, by Apolline Traoré, 2017

Senegalese business woman Adjara develops a friendships with three other women from different countries during a bus journey across West Africa. The journey from Dakar, via Mali, Burkina Faso and Benin to Lagos (Nigeria) is full of complications and the women have to face all kinds of dangers as they accomplish an everyday journey while facing the universal challenge of being independent women.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 10:15
- 12:00
- 14:00

The country knowledge profiles (https://www.africaknows.eu/country-profiles/) include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 16:00
- 16:15 Coffee break
- 16:30

David Ehrhardt (Co-Chair Leiden African Studies Assembly) is an Associate Professor at Leiden University College The Hague. He is specialised in international development. His research has mainly focused on urban Nigeria, with some comparative work on the Netherlands, and the themes of violent conflict, Islam and interfaith relations, non-state political authorities, and citizenship.

David introduces the blog aspect of the site: see here for the blogs

- 16:45

Dr Amanda Hammar (an associate professor of the Centre of African Studies of the University of Copenhagen and current President of AEGIS, the European African Studies Association) gives her initial reflections on the opening three days of Africa Knows! - a Thematic Conference of AEGIS.

There follow a few words from the organisers:

Ton Dietz, together with Marieke van Winden, is the main organizer of the Africa Knows! conference. He is co-chair of the Leiden African Studies Assembly. He used to be director of the African Studies Centre Leiden (2010-2017), and Professor of African Development at Leiden University.

Marieke van Winden used to be the communications expert of the African Studies Centre Leiden, and she also is a private teacher for the French language to Dutch people. Together with Ton Dietz she is the main organizer of the Africa Knows! Conference.

- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 mins, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 12:00
- 16:00
- 12:00
- 18:00

This film paints a portrait of a Senegalese scientist who was a trail-blazing scholar with an insatiable thirst for science and knowledge as well as an honest, enlightened political figure, venerated by some, decried by others, and unknown to most. It’s the story of the lifework of Cheikh Anta Diop, who studied Philosophy, Physics, Chemistry, History and Linguistics. All this knowledge came together in his thesis: Africa is the birthplace of civilisation and the Egyptian pharaohs were black Africans. A claim that came with a high price. This film tells the story of a man who fought his whole life for truth and justice in order to restore historical awareness and dignity to Africa.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 15:45
- 11:30
- 11:30
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 14:00

The country knowledge profiles (https://www.africaknows.eu/country-profiles/) include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 16:00
- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 mins, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 13:00

10:00-11:15 part 1

break

11:45- 13:00 part 2


View the details here.

- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 16:00
- 21:20

Documentary film, 69 mins, by Matthias De Groof, 2018

While disassembling the metre-high statue of Leopold II, his ghost wanders through the corridors and halls of the museum. The renovation of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (now Africa Museum) in Tervuren (Belgium) is an opportunity to give a modern interpretation to the museum's existence and mission. The stuffed wild animals, the traditional masks and the dusted artifacts are to make way for a more complete, modern view on Africa. The museum calls on the help of experts and initiates consultations with representatives of African organisations that have joined forces in a structure set up for this purpose, COMRAF. Exhibiting the minerals from the Congolese soil is no longer just a matter of scientific explanation. We must also consider the horrific conditions in which these raw materials were mined and the disruptive consequences for Congolese society. But in order to completely dislodge the majestic building from its colonial form, more fundamental questions also need to be asked. Who is looking at whom here? And whose story is being told here? This film documents the renovation of the Africa Museum as a process of aesthetic mourning, shows the complexity of its transformation and reveals through the eyes of the African diaspora in Belgium what the renovation really puts at stake: the decolonization of the Self.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 13:00
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 16:30

14.10-14.20 keynote lecture Mustapha Mekideche (his second keynote) about ‘the New Economic Paradigm

15.00-15.10 keynote lecture Stephane Monnay (Cafrad) about ‘African strategy of financing knowledge and research

Video clip: North Africa Economic Outlook 2020 - Coping with the COVID-19 Pandemic

See here for the panel agenda.

View the details here.

- 21:45

Documentary film, 104 mins, by Hassen Ferhani, 2019

In her small shop, in the vast Algerian Sahara desert, Malika offers her guests a place to rest, eat, and, most of all, a listening ear. Chauffeurs, musicians and unintelligible tourists, Malika listens to all their stories. Portrait of a warm and charming woman and the beauty of Algeria’s landscape.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 21:45

Documentary film, 91 min, by Jared P. Scott, 2019

The effects of climate change on Africa’s Sahel region are devastating: desertification, famine, conflict and migration. Yet hope lies in the Great Green Wall, an ambitious reforestation project of 8.000 km spanning the continent aimed at revitalizing ecosystems and restoring economies. In this story of resilience and self-determination, Malian musician/activist Inna Modja journeys from Senegal via Mali, Nigeria, Niger and Ethiopia to Djibouti gathering stories and sharing songs with those on the frontline of the fight to save their land and their ways of life. With, amongst others, Songhoy Blues, Didier Awadi en Betty G.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 14:00

09:30-11:30 part 1

break

12:00- 14:00 part 2

See here for the panel schedule

View the details here.

- 15:30

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 18:30

15.30-16.45 part 1

break

17:15-18:30 part 2

View the details here.

- 21:45

Documentary film, 92 min, by Dieudo Hamadi, 2014

This documentary follows a group of young Congolese high school students who are about to sit the exam for their National Diploma, the "Final Exams", in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo. Dieudo Hamadi’s camera films them as they prepare for the exam, from the benches of the school that they are regularly ejected from because they haven’t paid the 'teachers’ fees' to the “maquis” (a communal house) where they gather to revise and the chaotic streets of the city where they spend their time “looking for a living”.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 17:00

13.30-14.30 part 1

break

14.45-15.45 part 2

break

16.00-17.00 part 3

View the details here.

- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 mins, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 14:00

The country knowledge profiles (https://www.africaknows.eu/country-profiles/) include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 16:00
- 21:30

Feature film, 69 mins, by Apolline Traoré, 2017

Senegalese business woman Adjara develops a friendships with three other women from different countries during a bus journey across West Africa. The journey from Dakar, via Mali, Burkina Faso and Benin to Lagos (Nigeria) is full of complications and the women have to face all kinds of dangers as they accomplish an everyday journey while facing the universal challenge of being independent women.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 20:40

Documentary film, 40 min, by Mirjam de Bruijn and Sjoerd Sijsma, 2019

"In this film, produced by Voice4Thought, we follow two researchers who, on their turn, follow people who live(d) through long periods of violence, conflict and hardship in Chad and Mali. The stories they encounter are stories of lost hopes, of feelings of being misunderstood, and of radicalization in multiple ways. The two stories of the researchers show how working on such stories also influences their positions, and finally radicalizes their positions.

This film tells the story of the process of radicalization. However, it is mostly a reflection on this process, and how it is an almost inevitable outcome of an unjust world. It raises questions such as: Is it possible to keep distance from the stories when you study them? How do you reflect on the suffering you see? And how does this influence their work and the decisions they take? What do these stories tell us about political interventions in radicalization processes?

This film is freely accessible. See here.

Click here to watch the film.

- 15:45

11:30-12.45 part 1

break

14:30-15:45 part 2

Please notice that this meeting is taking place in MSTeams. If you do not have the application installed, choose 'continue in browser' option.

View the details here.

- 20:25

Documentary film, 25 mins, by Iara Lee, 2020

In Lesotho—a highland country surrounded by South Africa—an artist named Nthabiseng TeReo Mohanela takes discarded materials and transforms them into unique clothing and accessories. Teaching young people the benefits of recycling and re-creation, she calls her project “From Trash to Treasure.” With TeReo’s work as a starting point, this short film showcases a broader spirit of reimagination among artists in Lesotho, who use creativity to respond to entrenched social problems: Filmmakers show the need to end child marriage. Musicians write songs about climate change. Farmers collect seeds to protect endangered tree species. Designers use fashion to preserve traditional Basotho culture and challenge common perceptions of Africa. Profiling a variety of these innovators, "FROM TRASH TO TREASURE: turning negatives into positives" encourages us to take lessons from those who rethink, reuse, and reinvent in order to promote positive change.

This film is freely accessible. See here.

Click here to watch the film.

- 15:45

11:30-12:45 part 1

break

14:30-15:45 part 2

Click here for panel agenda.

View the details here.

- 21:40

Documentary film, 69 mins, by Matthias De Groof, 2018

While disassembling the metre-high statue of Leopold II, his ghost wanders through the corridors and halls of the museum. The renovation of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (now Africa Museum) in Tervuren (Belgium) is an opportunity to give a modern interpretation to the museum's existence and mission. The stuffed wild animals, the traditional masks and the dusted artifacts are to make way for a more complete, modern view on Africa. The museum calls on the help of experts and initiates consultations with representatives of African organisations that have joined forces in a structure set up for this purpose, COMRAF. Exhibiting the minerals from the Congolese soil is no longer just a matter of scientific explanation. We must also consider the horrific conditions in which these raw materials were mined and the disruptive consequences for Congolese society. But in order to completely dislodge the majestic building from its colonial form, more fundamental questions also need to be asked. Who is looking at whom here? And whose story is being told here? This film documents the renovation of the Africa Museum as a process of aesthetic mourning, shows the complexity of its transformation and reveals through the eyes of the African diaspora in Belgium what the renovation really puts at stake: the decolonization of the Self.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 18:00

14:00-15:30 part 1

break

16:00-18:00 part 2

View the details here.

- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 mins, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 17:00

13:30-15:00 part 1

break

15:30-17:00 part 2

View the details here.

- 20:45

Documentary film, 42 mins, by Éric Hahonou and Lotte Pelckmans, 2016

Amongst the many groups which inhabit the river banks and islands scattered along the 4200 kilometers of the Niger river, the Kebbawa stand out for their peculiar nomadic lifestyle. Little is known about these migrant fishermen who form convoys of large wooden boats (called 'pinasses') on which they navigate together from Northern Nigeria (Yauri, Lake Kainji) to North-Western Niger (around Ayorou) and Eastern Mali (Ansongo, Gao, Timbuktu, Tindirma) where fish is abundant during the dry season. At the head of each convoy stands a man – the navigator – whose role is to guide safely the boats from Nigeria to Niger/Mali. The navigator or pilot is the one who makes sure the boats will not hit a rock, take a blind way, or run aground on a shoal in the river.

This film is freely accessible. See here.


- 12:00
- 13:30

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 13:30

The country knowledge profiles (https://www.africaknows.eu/country-profiles/) include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 17:00

13:30-15:00 part 1

break

15:30-17:00 part 2

View the details here.

- 21:30

Feature film, 69 mins, by Apolline Traoré, 2017

Senegalese business woman Adjara develops a friendships with three other women from different countries during a bus journey across West Africa. The journey from Dakar, via Mali, Burkina Faso and Benin to Lagos (Nigeria) is full of complications and the women have to face all kinds of dangers as they accomplish an everyday journey while facing the universal challenge of being independent women.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:00
- 20:20

Documentary film, 18 mins, by Awa Farah, Alice Aedy, 2020

Writer and producer Awa Farah and filmmaker Alice Aedy made a documentary to express her experiences as a British-Somali woman at Cambridge University. Awa had become increasingly irritated by what she saw as a stereotypical depiction of Somali people and, more widely, black, Muslim women. Against the backdrop of the Black Lives Matter movement, and with elite universities under attack for their poor diversity records, Somalinimo follows the conversations of Awa and three other Cambridge University students, Miske Ali, Hafsa Said and Samiya Dubed. The women talk about their immigrant parents, discuss their heritage, unpack identity conflicts and find solidarity in what might have been an intimidating and isolating environment. Somalinimo is also a love-letter to Somali culture: with a distinctive visual approach, it takes us inside one of the most traditional institutions in the UK as well as a the set design of a traditional Somali home, to evoke a powerful sense of nostalgia.

This film is freely accessible. See here.

- 12:45

10.00-11.15 part 1

break

11.30-12.45 part 2

View the details here.

- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 15:15
- 21:35

Documentary film, 92 min, by Dieudo Hamadi, 2014

This documentary follows a group of young Congolese high school students who are about to sit the exam for their National Diploma, the "Final Exams", in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo. Dieudo Hamadi’s camera films them as they prepare for the exam, from the benches of the school that they are regularly ejected from because they haven’t paid the 'teachers’ fees' to the “maquis” (a communal house) where they gather to revise and the chaotic streets of the city where they spend their time “looking for a living”.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 16:00
- 20:25

Documentary film, 25 mins, by Iara Lee, 2020

In Lesotho—a highland country surrounded by South Africa—an artist named Nthabiseng TeReo Mohanela takes discarded materials and transforms them into unique clothing and accessories. Teaching young people the benefits of recycling and re-creation, she calls her project “From Trash to Treasure.” With TeReo’s work as a starting point, this short film showcases a broader spirit of reimagination among artists in Lesotho, who use creativity to respond to entrenched social problems: Filmmakers show the need to end child marriage. Musicians write songs about climate change. Farmers collect seeds to protect endangered tree species. Designers use fashion to preserve traditional Basotho culture and challenge common perceptions of Africa. Profiling a variety of these innovators, "FROM TRASH TO TREASURE: turning negatives into positives" encourages us to take lessons from those who rethink, reuse, and reinvent in order to promote positive change.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

See film here.

This film is freely accessible. See here for the freely accessible films.

- 12:00
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 14:00

The country knowledge profiles (https://www.africaknows.eu/country-profiles/) include a selection of university buildings in Africa, but Africa’s universities are about people: about students and staff. On universities websites, and on their facebook accounts, one can find numerous examples of pictures of university people. This powerpoint gives a selection of the great variety of ways universities show what it means to be knowledge institutes in Africa in 2020. Please enjoy! And if you like: look for yourself as well: the country knowledge profiles include all university websites, which opens a world of visual imaginations for you!

Universities
- 16:00
- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 min, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 15:45

11:30-12:15 part 1

break

14:30-15:45 part 2

See panel agenda here.

View the details here.

- 21:35

Documentary film, 91 min, by Jared P. Scott, 2019

The effects of climate change on Africa’s Sahel region are devastating: desertification, famine, conflict and migration. Yet hope lies in the Great Green Wall, an ambitious reforestation project of 8.000 km spanning the continent aimed at revitalizing ecosystems and restoring economies. In this story of resilience and self-determination, Malian musician/activist Inna Modja journeys from Senegal via Mali, Nigeria, Niger and Ethiopia to Djibouti gathering stories and sharing songs with those on the frontline of the fight to save their land and their ways of life. With, amongst others, Songhoy Blues, Didier Awadi en Betty G.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

- 12:45

10:00-11:15 part 1

break

11:30-12:45 part 2

View the details here.

- 20:25

Documentary film, 40 min, by Mirjam de Bruijn and Sjoerd Sijsma, 2019

"In this film, produced by Voice4Thought, we follow two researchers who, on their turn, follow people who live(d) through long periods of violence, conflict and hardship in Chad and Mali. The stories they encounter are stories of lost hopes, of feelings of being misunderstood, and of radicalization in multiple ways. The two stories of the researchers show how working on such stories also influences their positions, and finally radicalizes their positions.

This film tells the story of the process of radicalization. However, it is mostly a reflection on this process, and how it is an almost inevitable outcome of an unjust world. It raises questions such as: Is it possible to keep distance from the stories when you study them? How do you reflect on the suffering you see? And how does this influence their work and the decisions they take? What do these stories tell us about political interventions in radicalization processes?

Film link will be available on the screening day.

Watch the film here.

This film is freely accessible.

- 16:45

14.00-15.15 part 1

break

15.30-16.45 part 2

See panel agenda here.

View the details here.

- 20:20

Documentary film, 18 mins, by Awa Farah, Alice Aedy, 2020

Writer and producer Awa Farah and filmmaker Alice Aedy made a documentary to express her experiences as a British-Somali woman at Cambridge University. Awa had become increasingly irritated by what she saw as a stereotypical depiction of Somali people and, more widely, black, Muslim women. Against the backdrop of the Black Lives Matter movement, and with elite universities under attack for their poor diversity records, Somalinimo follows the conversations of Awa and three other Cambridge University students, Miske Ali, Hafsa Said and Samiya Dubed. The women talk about their immigrant parents, discuss their heritage, unpack identity conflicts and find solidarity in what might have been an intimidating and isolating environment. Somalinimo is also a love-letter to Somali culture: with a distinctive visual approach, it takes us inside one of the most traditional institutions in the UK as well as a the set design of a traditional Somali home, to evoke a powerful sense of nostalgia.

This film is freely accessible. See here.

- 15:15
- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 min, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

Watch the film here. pw: fall

- 15:30

10:30-12.00 part 1

break

14:00-15:30 part 2

See panel agenda/programme here.

View the details here.

- 20:35

Documentary film, 32 mins, by Ras Mutabaruka, 2020

This documentary examines the scientific capabilities of the African continent and the contribution of the Africans and the African diaspora. It is a quest for the origins of science in Africa, the influence of colonialism and slavery on the development of science up to the present day.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

Watch the film here. pw: 9412

- 11:45

9:30 - 11:45 sessions in breakout rooms

11:00-11:45 key take-aways - discussion

See panel agenda here.

View the details here.

- 20:35

Documentary film, 32 mins, by Ras Mutabaruka, 2020

This documentary examines the scientific capabilities of the African continent and the contribution of the Africans and the African diaspora. It is a quest for the origins of science in Africa, the influence of colonialism and slavery on the development of science up to the present day.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

Watch the film here. pw: 9412

- 15:30
- 21:25

Documentary film, 85 mins, by Rehad Desai, 2018

When South African universities raised their fees in 2015 there were peaceful protests on the part of the students at University of the Witwatersrand. During these protests the university called in the police force. The film shows how the conflict escalated and showed division among the university staff as well as exposing power relationships and inequality among the genders and races.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

Watch the film here. pw: fall

- 12:00
- 14:00

Delegates are invited to watch this performance by kora player, Layba Diawara. Layba Diawara, kora player

Layba Diawara was born in a family of professional musicians in Faranah (Guinea, West Africa) in 1961. His family helped him to find his way in the rich repertoire of Djali music and motivated him to play in different orchestras and to search for new experiences across regional and national borders. He played as a guitarist in different ensembles before he was asked to join the famous national orchestra "Bembeya Jazz International" in Guinea's capital Conakry. As a guitarist in Bembeya Jazz, he made his first tour to Europe and the US in 1985. In 1990 he settled in the Netherlands where, till today, he plays different styles of music (traditional African, jazz, soul, classic), solo, and with different groups (African, Dutch, International). Layba is a multi-instrumentalist and plays kora, balafon, guitar, and ngoni.

- 21:40

Documentary film, 69 mins, by Matthias De Groof, 2018

While disassembling the metre-high statue of Leopold II, his ghost wanders through the corridors and halls of the museum. The renovation of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (now Africa Museum) in Tervuren (Belgium) is an opportunity to give a modern interpretation to the museum's existence and mission. The stuffed wild animals, the traditional masks and the dusted artifacts are to make way for a more complete, modern view on Africa. The museum calls on the help of experts and initiates consultations with representatives of African organisations that have joined forces in a structure set up for this purpose, COMRAF. Exhibiting the minerals from the Congolese soil is no longer just a matter of scientific explanation. We must also consider the horrific conditions in which these raw materials were mined and the disruptive consequences for Congolese society. But in order to completely dislodge the majestic building from its colonial form, more fundamental questions also need to be asked. Who is looking at whom here? And whose story is being told here? This film documents the renovation of the Africa Museum as a process of aesthetic mourning, shows the complexity of its transformation and reveals through the eyes of the African diaspora in Belgium what the renovation really puts at stake: the decolonization of the Self.

Film link will be available on the screening day.

EN : https://vimeo.com/336069516 password: Palimpseste052019
FR : https://vimeo.com/355547059 password: Palimpseste052019
NL : https://vimeo.com/355551462 password: Palimpseste052019