C01
Polychronicity [Combined format]

Convenors:
Ute Eickelkamp (University of Sydney)
Melinda Hinkson (Deakin University)
Location:
A4-003
Start time:
7 December, 2018 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Multiple temporalities co-exist and are being produced within and beyond living and non-living realms, but on unequal terms. This panel invites contributions that bring into view temporal alliances that might be life-enabling.

Long abstract:

Representing opposing regimes of value but sharing common historical 'roots', global capitalism's time-space compression and systemic ecological paradigms both promote a cyclical temporality. Both also promote a discourse of precarious balance, of growth, decline, collapse, innovation and revival across fiscal, biocultural and astrophysical realms. Somewhat paradoxically, the vision of a looming anthropocenic catastrophe that will end life on Earth resumes (in altered form) the modernist sense of time as pressing forward. And as pressing forward fast, as the telos of futurity is shifting its ground from limitless techno-economic progress to implosive ending once and for all. Polychronicity is a fact of life and of non-life; whether conceived of as an instant or as duration, multiple temporalities co-exist and are being produced within and beyond single organisms and scales. The time of memory and forgetting, of lived experience, of religious faith and cosmologies, of the 'forces of nature', the growth of plants, melting ice, and dying species, of chemical and physical processes, of industrial labor, artistic practices, mechanical and digital technologies, bureaucracy and the state - all co-exist but on unequal terms. Is there such a thing as 'the good' and 'the bad' of time? This panel invites contributions that bring into view temporalities that are life-enabling. We seek empirical and conceptual works that respond to the planet's temporal diversity, by way of counter-narrative or other forms of creative expression.