(P04)
Performing heritage, sustaining livelihoods: resilience, recognition and relationality
Location The Cairns Institute, D3-149
Date and Start Time 05 Dec, 2018 at 11:15
Sessions 1

Convenors

  • Fiona Magowan (Queen's University Belfast) email
  • Hastings Donnan (Queen's University of Belfast) email

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Short abstract

This panel invites papers that address legacies and strategies of performing heritage in terms of dealing structurally and emotionally with inequalities, marginalisation, adaptation, transformation and co-production as they variously create conditions for resilience, recognition and peacebuilding.

Long abstract

This panel invites papers that address legacies and contemporary strategies of performing heritage in terms of dealing structurally and emotionally with inequalities, marginalisation, adaptation, transformation and co-production as they variously create conditions for resilience, recognition and peacebuilding. We seek to understand how culturally emergent forms of knowledge production, narratives and performances have influenced '…adversity, resilience, inequalities and transformational change' (Hart et. al 2016) in Australia and around the globe. We ask, how do relationships inform the research process; what is the role of emotion in informing both performances and heritage legacies; and what structural, policy and heritage incongruences exist in the ways that cultural heritage agendas and performances are valued and recognised in particular contexts or for external audiences? What measures need to be considered in order to effect greater recognition and emplacement of cultural and performing heritages as central to policymaking in government and in the hard language of policy? What happens beyond anthropology in the co-production of our research? In particular, to what extent is research on heritage and sustainability taken seriously as exemplars of the intercultural dynamics of peacebuilding, advancing health and wellbeing and informing governmental processes? What else needs to happen to ensure that the co-creation of research outcomes is influential in political processes both inside and outside the academy?

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.

Papers

"But if they keep digging deep down they might find something": the heritage consultative meeting, performing heritage and sustaining livelihoods

Authors: Edward McDonald (Ethnosciences) email
Bryn Coldrick (Ancestral Voices Ltd) email
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Short abstract

This paper examines the on-site 'heritage consultative meeting' in which 'consequential talk' plays a central role, as integral in the performance of Aboriginal heritage and an essential element in sustaining Aboriginal livelihoods in the Pilbara region of Western Australia.

Long abstract

Aboriginal heritage assessments, including archaeological and ethnographic surveys and community consultations, are central to approvals processes, for mineral exploration and mining in the Pilbara and other regions of Western Australia. These processes have given rise to a 'heritage economy' which forms a sizeable portion of the domestic economy in Aboriginal communities.

Integral to the assessment processes is the on-site 'heritage consultative meeting', which forms part of a larger process of community, commercial and statutory meetings and decision-making processes or 'conjured contexts' (Brown, Reed & Yarrow 2017). During the on-site 'heritage consultative meeting', Aboriginal people are routinely required to assess the significance of places and objects and comment on their management, including proposals for mitigative archaeological research such as test excavations. In the latter case, they may be asked to decide about investigating an indeterminate or conjured object, referred to as a potential archaeological deposit.

Drawing on the 'ethnography of meetings' (Schwartzman 1989), we seek to provide an ethnographic analysis of 'the heritage consultative meeting' as a central element in the performance of heritage in Western Australia. The paper examines how the 'heritage consultative meeting', as a 'communicative event' in which 'consequential talk' plays a central role in participants resolution of emergent heritage issues and how the decisions emerge as a series of situated relationships between people, places, objects, potentials, and documents. While at the same time addressing its role in sustaining Aboriginal livelihoods within the 'heritage economy'.

"Lacks integrity and authenticity": trade, trading and uncomfortable encounters between heritage, globalisation and livelihood in Jakarta

Author: Traci Sudana (University of the Sunshine Coast) email
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Short abstract

This paper considers recognition and performance of trade and trading in Jakarta's old town, and considers how trade and trading impact upon livelihoods and everyday socialities.

Long abstract

In July 2018, Jakarta's old town was rejected as a Heritage Listed site by UNESCO on the grounds that it "lacks integrity and authenticity".

That the area was once host to a "golden age of trade" was not disputed.

This paper fast forwards to a more contemporary Indonesia, and considers why some trades flourish and others are threatened in present day Jakarta, and how performance of trade influences everyday socialities.

This specific cultural context is considered through Aihwa Ong's concepts around the interplay of global forces intersecting with everyday practices. Of interest, is how different trade and traders get different investment, care and protection from the state, based on their relationship to global capital. Furthermore, how does this impact upon livelihood and socialities?

The paper is based on more than 24 months of longitudinal ethnographic field work with trans-regional medicine traders in Jakarta between 2007-2018. When this research commenced, trading medicine by the roadside was a popular profession. Fast forward to 2018, and medicine trading in this form is a threatened practice, often because of issues of perceived integrity and inauthenticity, while other forms of trade flourish.

Music, marginality and resilience: performing heritage as adaptive strategy

Author: Fiona Magowan (Queen's University Belfast) email
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Short abstract

While music has been deployed in conflict and post-conflict settings for a range of ends, one of the major challenges facing the world today is how refugees and forced migrants have drawn on the power of music to find hope and healing following trauma, violence and the aftermath of conflict.

Long abstract

While music has been deployed in conflict and post-conflict settings for a range of ends, one of the major challenges facing the world today is how refugees have drawn on the power of music to find hope and healing following trauma and violence in the aftermath of conflict. This paper analyses how it is both in turning emotional weakness towards a music of persuasion in tandem with how others listen to lament as well as to responses around displacement that a new language of emotion emerges in the interstices of intercultural experience. This paper will discuss how a musical and emotional nexus of displacement can generate an emotive language of persuasion, which goes beyond the music-making itself. While Juslin and Sloboda (2001) have noted that emotional registers are difficult to measure, Gabrielsson (2001: 448) notes that 'it remains a fascinating challenge, although frustrating at times, to investigate how, why, and in what context we can be so strongly affected by music'. Drawing upon narratives of musicians who are working with refugees, this paper considers how refugees have been inspired by their musical heritage to reshape new spaces of resilience, as well as hope and recognition for their futures.

Taking the street mainstream: the power of performance to alter social inequalities

Author: Sharmaine Jackson (Stetson University ) email
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Short abstract

Based upon ethnographic research in the US and Australia, this paper explores how urban youth use krump dancing as a strategy to overcome trauma born out of cultural and structural limitations.

Long abstract

Based upon ethnographic research in the US and Australia, this paper explores how urban youth use krump dancing as a strategy to overcome trauma born out of cultural and structural limitations. Krump dancing is an urban street dance that started around 2000 in Los Angeles, California as an alternative to gang violence. The dance incorporates community traditions of morality and collective experiences. Since its inception, krump is practiced around the globe with local dimensions to its character.

In this paper, I examine how krump dancers move between "street" and "decent" embodiments to reshape, define and challenge each milieu. In doing so, this paper considers how krump dancers go beyond individual coping mechanisms to changing social structures. Through community centers and parks, public schools, and dance studios, krumpers institutionalize elements of krump, thereby making space and altering the life chances of youth. In this paper, I compare two krump crews: one from Los Angeles, CA and another from Melbourne, VIC.

Functioning customary law for survival : adaptation and resistance in Kasepuhan Ciptagelar, Sukabumi District, West Java

Author: Tine Suartina (The University of Western Australia) email
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Short abstract

A traditional group whose belief and law from ancestors heredity show contestation between traditional and modern systems at the grass root level for the survival Adaptation and resistance are a continuum. Here a marginalized community is able to decide stance and choice supported by customary law.

Long abstract

A diverse society often contains certain traditional groups who keep practicing their belief and law despite fully embracing modernization. The ultimate rationales usually based on their ancestors' heredity and the suitability. Kasepuhan Ciptagelar, one of adat (customary) communities located in Halimun Mountain in Sukabumi District in West Java Province, represents this case. Taking examples on their agriculture arrangement and giving birth case, this community, together with its 160s hutments (kampongs) and 568 groups of extended family, provide a vivid example of how the real and actual contestation between traditional and modern systems actually takes place at the grass root level. In addition, both cases emphasize that community's considerations are significantly related to their survival. By process, the community's adaptation, resistance or even change is a continuum that proceeds over time, and has faced challenges and sacrificed certain "price" to pay. Employing legal anthropology and socio-legal approaches, the discussion is also aimed to change the general assumption that a politically marginalized community is mere incapable and passive. Conversely, this community's experience shows that for their sustainability, they are competent to be active and to determine their stances and suitable choice for them. This is supported by a durable social cohesion and managed by a sustaining customary law.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.