P04
Performing heritage, sustaining livelihoods: resilience, recognition and relationality

Convenors:
Fiona Magowan (Queen's University Belfast)
Hastings Donnan (Queen's University of Belfast)
Location:
The Cairns Institute, D3-149
Start time:
5 December, 2018 at 11:15
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel invites papers that address legacies and strategies of performing heritage in terms of dealing structurally and emotionally with inequalities, marginalisation, adaptation, transformation and co-production as they variously create conditions for resilience, recognition and peacebuilding.

Long abstract:

This panel invites papers that address legacies and contemporary strategies of performing heritage in terms of dealing structurally and emotionally with inequalities, marginalisation, adaptation, transformation and co-production as they variously create conditions for resilience, recognition and peacebuilding. We seek to understand how culturally emergent forms of knowledge production, narratives and performances have influenced '…adversity, resilience, inequalities and transformational change' (Hart et. al 2016) in Australia and around the globe. We ask, how do relationships inform the research process; what is the role of emotion in informing both performances and heritage legacies; and what structural, policy and heritage incongruences exist in the ways that cultural heritage agendas and performances are valued and recognised in particular contexts or for external audiences? What measures need to be considered in order to effect greater recognition and emplacement of cultural and performing heritages as central to policymaking in government and in the hard language of policy? What happens beyond anthropology in the co-production of our research? In particular, to what extent is research on heritage and sustainability taken seriously as exemplars of the intercultural dynamics of peacebuilding, advancing health and wellbeing and informing governmental processes? What else needs to happen to ensure that the co-creation of research outcomes is influential in political processes both inside and outside the academy?