Plenary A
Contemporary articulations of kinship and gender

Convenors:
Thomas Hylland Eriksen (University of Oslo)
Discussant:
Elisabeth Kirtsoglou (Durham University)
Location:
Aula Magna
Start time:
21 July, 2016 at 14:30
Session slots:
0

Short abstract:

While kinship and gender have been central to anthropological research, seen both separately and together, this plenary session takes stock and looks ahead, exploring ways in which contemporary research on kinship and gender relates to earlier perspectives.

Long abstract:

Kinship has been a central preoccupation for anthropologists since Morgan, while gender has been a key concept since the 1970s. This plenary session takes into account the anthropological legacies of studying kinship and gender, whether separately or together, and looks ahead. While the plenary explores ways in which contemporary research on kinship and gender relates to earlier perspectives, the main emphasis is on current concerns. The very categories of kinship and gender as comparative concepts have repeatedly been questioned, and the empirical importance of these criteria of social differentiation is often challenged, yet the concepts are still in the backbone of anthropological analysis. How, we ask, can the human condition today be read through these concepts (and empirical realities)? What are the questions that need to be asked now? And do the shifts in anthropological theorising of kinship and gender reflect historical changes, and if so, how?